THE TEAM

Created for us, by us.

A few dedicated members of LGBTQ+ and ally communities make the study possible,
but it’s your contributions that will make The PRIDE Study a success!

Directors

Mitchell R. Lunn, MD, MAS

CO-DIRECTOR

The PRIDE Study

CO-DIRECTOR

PRIDEnet

Mitchell R. Lunn, MD, MAS

Co-Director The PRIDE Study
Co-Director PRIDEnet
Pronouns: he, him, his
Mitchell (Mitch) R. Lunn, MD, MAS is an Assistant Professor in Division of Nephrology of the Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Mitch is a long-standing advocate for sexual and gender minority (SGM) inclusion in research and higher education who lectures around the country on SGM medical education, SGM health, and SGM community engagement. He serves on the Advisory Committee for the Medical School Campus Pride Index; is a member of the American Society of Nephrology’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee; and is a founding member of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Medical Education Research Group (LGBT MERG) at Stanford University School of Medicine. LGBT MERG’s study on SGM health-related content in medical school curricula has influenced individual institutions and national organizations to examine their policies, procedures, educational environments, and curricular content to improve the culture of academic medicine for SGM people. In recognition of his work, he received the 2015 University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Chancellor’s Award for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Leadership.

Mitch is delighted to be joining his passions of SGM health research, internal medicine, and medical education in The PRIDE Study and PRIDEnet. Other areas of active research and interest include use of emerging technologies in research, remote data collection in nephrology, SGM institutional climate, and methods of evaluation, particularly in undergraduate and graduate medical education.

Mitch earned his Bachelor of Science degree with highest thesis honors from Tufts University in 2004, his Doctor of Medicine degree from Stanford University School of Medicine in 2010, and his Masters in Advanced Studies degree in Clinical Research from UCSF in 2017. He completed internal medicine residency training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (Boston, MA) in 2013 and nephrology fellowship at UCSF in 2016.

Stanford Medicine Profile
Juno Obedin-Maliver, MD, MPH, MAS

CO-DIRECTOR

The PRIDE Study

CO-DIRECTOR

PRIDEnet

Juno Obedin-Maliver, MD, MPH, MAS

Co-Director The PRIDE Study
Co-Director PRIDEnet
Pronouns: she, her, hers
Juno Obedin-Maliver, MD, MPH, MAS is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Juno graduated from Stanford University School of Medicine in 2010. While at Stanford, Juno maintained a focus on promoting social justice in medicine. Juno was honored with The Kaiser Permanente eQuality Scholarship for service to the LGBTQ community as well as the Markowski Leach Memorial Scholarship for LGBT Activism & Leadership.

Combined with a strong focus on women’s health, Juno continued her dedication to advancing LGBT health initiatives while completing her clinical residency in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in 2014 and a Fellowship in Women’s Health and Clinical Research at San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center in 2016.

While at UCSF, she has been honored with the San Francisco General Hospital Julius R. Krevans Award for Community Service and The UCSF Chancellor’s Award for GLBT Leadership. During her residency, Juno was active in health policy to expand reproductive possibilities in California and in efforts to remove national Medicare Non-Coverage Determination ruling on “transsexual surgery.” She is also on the Medical Advisory Board of the UCSF Center of Excellence for Transgender Health.

Juno is enthusiastically combining her interests in research, advocacy, and medicine to design and conduct The PRIDE Study and expand community engagement with research through PRIDEnet. Additional clinical, research, and advocacy activities include the gynecological and obstetrical health of transgender men and women and the health of veterans.

Stanford Medicine Bio Page

Associate Directors

Annesa Flentje, PhD

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR

The PRIDE Study

UCSF SITE DIRECTOR

The PRIDE Study

Annesa Flentje, PhD

Associate Director The PRIDE Study
UCSF Site Director The PRIDE Study
Pronouns: she, her, hers
Annesa Flentje, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the UCSF School of Nursing, Department of Community Health Systems. Annesa completed her PhD at the University of Montana and pre- and post-doctoral fellowships at UCSF. Annesa is a clinical psychologist who focuses on reducing health disparities among sexual and gender minority individuals. Her research has targeted multiple ways to reduce these disparities including prevention, increasing visibility of sexual and gender minorities in research and electronic health records, and improving mental health services for sexual and gender minorities. She has developed an individually delivered psychotherapeutic intervention to reduce sexual minority stress and is investigating this as a means to improve both health and mental health outcomes for sexual minorities. Annesa is funded through a K23 Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse investigating the underlying physiological pathways whereby stress and discrimination are related to deleterious health outcomes.

Annesa is thrilled to be a part of The PRIDE Study as a means to give voice to the physical and mental health needs of the diverse sexual and gender minority community.

Staff

Mahri Bahati, MPH

LGBTQ COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SPECIALIST

PRIDEnet

Mahri Bahati, MPH

LGBTQ Community Engagement Specialist PRIDEnet
Pronouns: she, her, hers
Mahri Bahati, MPH is a creative and passionate public health professional with extensive experience across the HIV/AIDS continuum of care, including anti-retroviral medication access, HIV prevention and surveillance, harm reduction, and community mobilization. Most recently she worked for the Global Forum on MSM and HIV as Public Health Advisor where she developed and managed a global capacity building project to facilitate organizational development and build self-sustainability for trans-led organizations throughout the global south. Her professional interests include sexual and gender minority health equity, HIV treatment adherence, PrEP access, and the prevention of sexually transmitted infections.

Mahri earned her Master of Public Health degree at the University of Kentucky in 2013, with a focus in Epidemiology. As an undergrad she began volunteering with local HIV/AIDS non-profits which sparked a professional interest in public health along with a lifelong interest in volunteering and community organizing.

Mahri is excited to join the PRIDE team as the All of Us Research Program Engagement Navigator, where she will work to engage 'yet to be reached' sexual and gender minority sub-communities who are new to health research, who have experienced barriers in accessing healthcare, or who have had negative research experiences.

Zubin Dastur, MS, MPH

LGBTQ DIGITAL CLINICAL RESEARCH MANAGER

The PRIDE Study/PRIDEnet

Zubin Dastur, MS, MPH

LGBTQ Digital Clinical Research Manager The PRIDE Study/PRIDEnet
Pronouns: he, him, his
Zubin Dastur, MS, MPH is the LGBTQ Digital Clinical Research Manager of The PRIDE Study in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Zubin joins PRIDE with 14 years of clinical research management experience. He is honored and humbled to be part of such an impactful and important endeavor to help underrepresented, underreported, and underserved LGBTQ populations that have been historically known to be stigmatized, ostracized, and victimized.


Zubin believes in promoting health and wellbeing through cutting-edge, evidence-based empirical research. At Columbia School of Social Work, he worked with disenfranchised and low-income families by implementing socially-driven prevention trials in New York. At Weill Cornell Medicine, he helped introduce survey technology in HIV/AIDS community-based hospital clinics in Queens and the Bronx. He managed multiple therapeutic trials that offered innovative therapies for all subtypes of breast cancer at Yale School of Medicine (Comprehensive Cancer Center) and Yale-New Haven Hospital. He has also managed multi-million-dollar NIH/NCI-funded, pharmaceutical-sponsored, and investigator-initiated trials at New York University (Cardiology) and University of Hawaii (Oncology). Zubin has been trained in providing culturally-responsive care for transgender and gender non-binary communities at Harvard School of Medicine.

Zubin earned a Master of Science (MS) degree in Health Policy and Management from Carnegie Mellon University and a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree in Social and Behavioral Sciences from the University of Alabama Birmingham. He hopes to get his PhD in LGBTQ Studies in the future to reduce healthcare inequities and health disparities among sexual, gender, and racial minority and marginalized populations.

In his spare time, Zubin loves to lounge on a beach, try different cuisines, travel to Paris, and incessantly watch British comedies. He comes to Stanford from Kaiser Permanente Hawai’i where he learned the importance of Social Work, and hopes to spread the Hawaiian principles of aloha (love), mahalo (thankfulness), and ho’ihi (respect).

Carolyn Hunt, MPA

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT DIRECTOR

PRIDEnet

Carolyn Hunt, MPA

Community Engagement Director PRIDEnet
Pronouns: she, her, hers
Carolyn Hunt, MPA is fascinated with developing ways to help diverse groups of people connect, address power imbalances, problem-solve, and take positive action together.

She has worked in community collaborative research settings for more than 20 years, starting at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), moving to non-profits, and ultimately landing at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She has managed projects in LGBTQ smoking cessation and alcohol and drug treatment and prevention and HIV/AIDS prevention.

Carolyn’s academic background includes Ethnic Studies and public and non-profit management. She has received national fellowships in African American Studies and public management as well as awards for her LGBT activism.

Carolyn is thrilled to serve as Community Engagement Director for PRIDEnet.
Micah Lubensky, PhD

PARTICIPANT ENGAGEMENT DIRECTOR

The PRIDE Study/PRIDEnet

Micah Lubensky, PhD

Participant Engagement Director The PRIDE Study/PRIDEnet
Pronouns: he, him, his
Micah Lubensky, PhD has always held a deep passion for and dedication to social justice for sexual and gender minority, racial/ethnic minority, and low-income communities. These passions helped motivate his graduate education at the University of California at Santa Cruz, and manifest his career as an applied social psychologist.

After completing his doctorate, Micah spent almost 10 years at the San Francisco AIDS Foundation (SFAF) as the Community Mobilization Manager, working predominantly with low-income African American SGM communities across the San Francisco Bay Area. His efforts focused on community education around HIV risk and holistic well-being, advocacy for increasing health resources specific to HIV and holistic health broadly, and building and sustaining African American SGM community.

After SFAF but before arriving at The PRIDE Study, Micah worked for the Global Forum on MSM & HIV (now called M-PACT) as the Community Development Manager. At M-PACT, Micah managed a global consortium of 10 regional and global networks of advocacy organizations that served SGM communities in resource-poor locations around the world (essentially everywhere except Western Europe and North America). There, Micah coordinated the consortium to harmonize efforts on HIV and human rights policy advocacy, HIV health resources, and political activism by SGM community members around the world.

Micah arrived on The PRIDE Study / PRIDEnet team in 2016 as the Program Manager. In his first two years, he was deeply involved in most aspects of our efforts, from development of the Annual Questionnaires and planning the PRIDEnet Summits, to responding to participant inquiries, to helping pay the invoices! Micah is now excited to focus his efforts more on tracking and improving the Participant Experience in The PRIDE Study, in order to maximize long-term participant retention. This position provides a unique opportunity for him to integrate his community engagement and research skills to contribute to this project of immense potential.
Jonathan Mayo

BIOSTATISTICIAN

The PRIDE Study / PRIDEnet

Jonathan Mayo

Biostatistician The PRIDE Study / PRIDEnet
Pronouns: he, him, his

Jonathan is originally from Maryland, but lived in California for 10 years before relocating to Madison, Wisconsin in 2019. As an undergraduate he attended University of Maryland, College Park and studied economics. After graduating he worked as a pharmacy technician at a local community hospital where his interest in medicine and health grew. He went on to study at George Washington University and received an MPH with a concentration in epidemiology and biostatistics. Thereafter, he worked for a few years doing military health research for the Army in Washington, DC and the Navy/Marine Corps in San Diego. For the past 11 years he has been working within the Stanford School of Medicine as a biostatistician at the Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research and the Department of Pediatrics Prematurity Research Center. The focus of his work has primarily been on analyzing California birth cohort data to understand and assess patterns related to preterm birth. His wife is a nurse currently studying to become a pediatric nurse practitioner. They have two daughters, 8 and 3 years old. In his free time he enjoys soccer, surfing, guitar, hiking, and being outdoors.

Anthony Pho, PhD, MPH, ANP-C

POSTDOCTORAL CLINICAL SCHOLAR

The PRIDE Study

STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Anthony Pho, PhD, MPH, ANP-C

Postdoctoral Clinical Scholar The PRIDE Study
Stanford University School of Medicine
Pronouns: he/him/his

Anthony Pho, PhD, MPH, ANP-C, is an adult nurse practitioner with over 12 years of clinical experience and a passion for promoting the health of LGBTQ people through his clinical practice, teaching, and research. He has held an adjunct faculty appointment at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing since 2013. Most recently he practiced as a per-diem medical provider at Callen-Lorde Community Health Center in NYC. Prior to this, he was a full-time primary care provider at Weill Cornell Medicine, where he developed and taught an LGBTQ health curriculum for medicine residents that was later expanded to the primary care clerkship. He began his clinical career as a registered nurse in emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Anthony’s doctoral research explored online health information seeking behavior, eHealth literacy, and human papillomavirus vaccination among transgender and gender expansive people. He earned his BA from U.C. Berkeley, BSN, MSN and MPH degrees from Johns Hopkins University, and PhD from Columbia University. In recognition of his leadership he was named a Robert Wood Johnson Future of Nursing Scholar, Johns Hopkins Daniels Interprofessional Fellow, Johns Hopkins University Leadership Fellow, and Columbia University Diversity Fellow. He currently serves on the Executive Committee of the LGBT Health Workforce Conference and the Board of Directors of GLMA: Health Professionals Advancing LGBT Equality. Prior to his career in nursing, Anthony worked for 12 years in the software industry in a variety of product and engineering management positions.

Ana Rescate, MBA

LGBTQ COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST

The PRIDE Study/PRIDEnet

Ana Rescate, MBA

LGBTQ Communications Specialist The PRIDE Study/PRIDEnet
Pronouns: she, her, hers

Ana Rescate, MBA brings deep expertise in multimedia and community affairs to The PRIDE Study, drawing from her experience in various communication roles throughout her career. 

In her free time, she volunteers on the leadership council team for Somos Familia, an organization founded by two moms from the East Bay, who wanted to create support and acceptance for Latina/o/x lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or questioning youth and their families. She is also a graduate of Equality California’s 2019 Leadership Academy in Northern California. In 2020, she joined the California Board of Psychology as an appointee of Governor Gavin Newsom.

A resident of the Bay Area, Ms. Rescate believes that all people have a right to be themselves without fear, and this philosophy is a through- line in all her roles. The credence that people deserve to tell their own stories underpins Ms. Rescate’s work. She strongly believes that each of us deserves to tell our own stories. As a queer WOC, she recognizes that her voice is her power and does what she can to empower others to use theirs. She earned her Master of Business Administration in marketing from Baker College and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in film and television from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. 

Gowri Sunder

RESEARCH ASSISTANT

The PRIDE Study

Gowri Sunder

Research Assistant The PRIDE Study
Pronouns: she/her/hers
Gowri Sunder is currently the clinical research coordinator on Dr. Annesa Flentje's team in UCSF's Community Health System and a candidate for a Master's of Design in Interaction Design at California College of the Arts. Gowri's research interests include the impact of chronic stressors on health and the design of health systems. She is also passionate about the intersection of technology and health, particularly how it can be leveraged to make healthcare more accessible and equitable. 
Lowellyn (Low) Sunga

OPERATIONS & ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST 

The PRIDE Study/PRIDEnet

Lowellyn (Low) Sunga

Operations & Administrative Specialist  The PRIDE Study/PRIDEnet
Pronouns: she/her/hers, they/them/theirs

Lowellyn (Low) has experience working with the LGBTQ+ community and has several years of administrative experience under her belt. She has worked in the non-profit sector within the last 5 years where she was one of the founding members of the San Mateo County Pride Center. She helped with developing programs, groups, and systems in San Mateo County and increasing the visibility of the LGBTQ+ community through her community-engagement and social and communication skills. 

Additionally, she has been an active community member providing support wherever she is needed. As a member of the LGBTQ+ PRIDE Initiative and Filipino Mental Health Initiative In San Mateo County, she strives to share resources and information to promote wellness in the community.

Low is ecstatic to bring her administrative skills and experience working with the LGBTQ+ community to Stanford's PRIDE study and PRIDEnet team and continue to build the much-needed visibility this community needs.

PRIDEnet Participant Advisory Committee (PAC)

Ward Carpenter, MD

Ward Carpenter, MD

Pronouns: he, him, his
Dr. Ward Carpenter is a Board--Certified Internist and expert in HIV medicine, transgender medicine, and LGBT primary care. He earned his medical degree from UMDNJ – Robert Wood Johnson Medical School where he first discovered his passion for community health. He did his residency training in Medicine-Pediatrics at St Vincent’s Hospital in New York City. Following his passion for LGBT health and care for the underserved, he worked at Callen-Lorde Community Health Center in NY, one of the premier LGBT health centers in the country. Dr. Carpenter then transitioned into private practice, taking over a busy HIV and primary care practice in Manhattan. Seeking an escape from NY’s long winters, Dr. Carpenter moved to Los Angeles in 2013 and returned to his LGBT community health roots, accepting a position as the Director of Primary Care at the Los Angeles LGBT Center. In this role, he continues to expand and optimize the Center’s offerings in primary care, HIV treatment and prevention, and transgender health.
Loree Cook-Daniels, MS

Loree Cook-Daniels, MS

Pronouns: she, her, hers
Loree Cook-Daniels, FORGE’s Policy and Program Director, has helped design and co-facilitate FORGE’s multiple in-person and virtual support groups, research studies, and programs since 2000. She has been involved in advocacy, research, training, and services for LGBT populations since 1975, and is nationally-known for her writing, training, and policy work on LGBT aging, trauma and trauma recovery, and transgender issues. She co-chairs the Policy Committee of the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs and serves on the National LGBT Aging Roundtable. Cook-Daniels holds a B.A. in women’s studies and history, an M.S. in conflict management, and a post-graduate Certificate in trauma counseling.
Richard Greene, MD, MHPE

Richard Greene, MD, MHPE

Pronouns: he, him, his
Richard E. Greene is an Associate Professor of Medicine at New York University School of Medicine. Dr. Greene serves as the Faculty Director of Health Disparities Education at NYU School of Medicine through the Office of Diversity Affairs, and in this role oversees the inclusion of Bias, Diversity, Health Disparities, and LGBTQ topics into the culture and curriculum of NYU’s medical center and educational programs. An active and passionate medical educator, Dr. Greene is also an Associate Program Director of the Primary Care Residency Program and presents extensively on many Primary Care topics including the musculoskeletal physical exam, foundations of primary care medicine and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender healthcare disparities. He also serves as an Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine/Primary Care Residency Program where he teaches on general primary care topics, musculoskeletal medicine, bias, and health disparities. Dr. Greene is the Medical Director for the Pride Health Center at NYC H+H/Bellevue Hospital. Dr. Greene also lectures on a national scale on the topic of LGBTQ Health Care Disparities and Transgender Health. Dr. Greene serves as the Medical Director of the Center for Health, Identity, Behavior and Prevention Studies (CHIBPS) through NYU’s Global Institute of Public Health. He also serves on the Board of Directors of GLMA: Health Professionals Advancing LGBT Equality.
Tari Hanneman, MPA

Tari Hanneman, MPA

Pronouns: she, her, hers
Tari Hanneman is the Director of the Health Equality Project at the Human Rights Campaign Foundation. In this role she oversees the annual LGBTQ Healthcare Equality Index (HEI) and other projects related to LGBTQ health and aging.

Tari has over 20 years of experience in the nonprofit and philanthropic sector, primarily focused in the areas of health and women’s issues. Prior to joining HRC, she served as the initial Director of The Women’s Fund of Winston-Salem where she led all aspects of developing The Fund’s programs and brand in the community. Prior to her move to North Carolina, she served in a number of roles at The California Endowment, one of the nation's largest health foundations. She has also worked for elected officials and non-profits focused on the environment, reproductive rights and HIV. She has a Master’s in Public Administration with an emphasis on Nonprofit Management from the University of Southern California, where she also did her undergraduate work.
Devin Hursey

Devin Hursey

Pronouns: he, him, his

Devin Hursey is an advocate for people living with HIV and public health, from Kansas City Missouri, currently pursuing dual master’s degrees in Public Health and strategic communications at the University of Missouri Columbia.  In 2019, Hursey was honored as one of the 40 under 40 in public health by de Beaumont.  His local and state work includes: legislative advocacy with the Missouri HIV Justice Coalition, and board membership of Blaqout KC.  In addition, Hursey is a steering committee member of the U.S. People Living with HIV Caucus, and a steering committee member of MPACT global action for gay men’s health and rights. Hursey was formerly an appointed member of the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and Viral Hepatitis.

Shalonda Ingram

Shalonda Ingram

Pronouns: s/he
Leveraging decades of experience, Shalonda Ingram is an innovator who embodies the mantra: Strategize. Design. Produce. 
Born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, Shalonda is committed to cultivating collective consciousness and empowering communities to take actions that transform their circumstances. Shalonda has deployed worldwide to produce transformative experiences with artists, activists, and changemakers. Native to grassroots activism, Shalonda serves social justice, spiritual, and corporate organizations to explore network effect and elevate opportunities for resource sharing. Shalonda influences existing structures to create collaborative environments for communities to thrive. Shalonda is honored to serve Queer+ Communities in the areas of arts presenting, wellness research, placemaking and enterprise development.
Wulf James-Roby

Wulf James-Roby

Pronouns: they/them

Wulf's passions include literacy, equity and advocacy for marginalized communities, including black, brown and indigenous rights, transgender and queer rights, and protections for people with disabilities. As Anchochaba Consulting LLC, Founder and Trans Empowerment Project, Consultant, they have been recognized by POZ Magazine as a top 100 trans/gender non-conforming leader in HIV/AIDS education and resources as the co-founder of Southern Oklahoma LGBTQIA+, the only community resource group for queer and gender non-conforming people, their families and allies in rural southern Oklahoma. 

Professionally, Wulf is the owner and founder of Anchochaba Consulting LLC, which focuses on equity, development (board, nonprofit, professional, personal), and auditing/ consulting in those spaces. Wulf has worked in social services and non profit organizations for more than a decade. Their work is currently focused on diversity, inclusion, literacy and poverty alleviation. 

Academically, they are currently pursuing an EdD in Organizational Leadership at Aspen University after having completed an MS in Native Leadership from Southeastern Oklahoma State University in 2020. They are a member of the membership and communications committee for the Open Door Collective and they serve as the Executive Director for the Arbuckle Literacy Leadership coalition, as well as in volunteer positions for local and nationwide organizations including Trans Empowerment Project and It's From the Heart.

Tonia Poteat, PhD, PA-C, MPH

Tonia Poteat, PhD, PA-C, MPH

Pronouns: she, her, hers
Tonia Poteat is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health with a joint appointment in the Department of International Health. Her research, teaching, and practice focus on HIV and LGBT health with particular attention to transgender health. She completed her doctoral dissertation on stigma, HIV risk, and access to health care for transgender adults, co-authored a global meta-analysis examining the burden of HIV among transgender women worldwide, and is lead author of a comprehensive review of HIV among transgender sex workers in The Lancet HIV and Sex Workers series. In addition to her academic work, she provides medical care for people living with HIV at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Dr. Poteat graduated from Yale University with a Bachelor’s degree in Biology in 1991 and received a Masters of Medical Science from Emory University’s Physician Assistant (PA) Program in 1995. She earned a Masters of Public Health from Rollins School of Public Health in 2007 and completed a PhD in the Social and Behavioral Interventions Program in the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health in 2012. During her 20 years as a PA, she has devoted her practice to providing medically appropriate and culturally competent care to members of the LGBT community as well as people living with HIV. Dr. Poteat is a certified HIV Specialist by the American Academy of HIV Medicine; and she has provided primary care for trans-identified individuals since 1996.
Asa Radix, MD, PhD, MPH

Asa Radix, MD, PhD, MPH

Pronouns: he, him, his, they, them, their, theirs
Dr. Asa Radix is trained in internal medicine and infectious diseases at the University of Connecticut, and also holds postgraduate qualifications in tropical medicine and public health. Previously Dr. Radix held the position of Associate Medical Director at Callen-Lorde. In addition to having a clinical practice (HIV primary care and transgender health), Asa coordinates electives in LGBT health for medical and nursing students and is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at NYU and Yale.

Dr. Radix is of West Indian origin and has a special interest in the needs of LGBT populations of immigrant status. For 7 years, Asa was the director of a public health department in the Netherlands Antilles and assisted in the development of insular strategic plans for HIV prevention as well as federal guidelines for communicable disease prevention. Other positions prior to Callen-Lorde have included being the medical director at the University of Hartford, serving a population of 5,000 undergraduates under 24 years of age and being an infectious disease specialist in private practice in West Hartford, Connecticut. A major focus of Dr. Radix’ work has been the development and dissemination of prevention, treatment and care guidelines for HIV+ and at-risk persons in the Caribbean including provision of LGBT cultural competency training to Caribbean healthcare providers.

Dr. Radix is an associate editor of Transgender Health and member of the editorial boards for the International Journal of Transgenderism and the PRN Notebook. Other contributions include being a consultant for the World Health Organization/PAHO on transgender health issues and the co-chair of the WHO/PAHO HIV/STI technical advisory committee. Dr. Radix is the site-PI/co-investigator for 3 NIH/NIMH studies, including a demonstration project on PrEP.
Sajani Raja

Sajani Raja

Pronouns: they/them/theirs

Sajani is a coordinator of the student-run Pride Community Clinic in San Antonio, which provides care to uninsured and underserved LGBTQ+ patients in South Texas. During their time in college, Sajani was involved with organizing in queer communities of color, and through work on several political campaigns, they became acquainted with the unique problems that LGBTQ+ people of color face in Texas. Sajani is currently pursuing an MD at UT Health San Antonio, where they engage in curriculum building to improve provider education on LGBTQ+ patient care. They are also a member of Texas Medical Association's LGBTQ+ section, where they work to raise awareness among medical providers of issues that LGBTQ+ patients face. Sajani has a B.A. in Health and Human Sciences from the University of Southern California.

Ramón Ramirez

Ramón Ramirez

Pronouns:
Ramón Ramirez has been working with the community for over 25 years in San Francisco and Los Angeles. Ramón has worked with many communities such as: monolingual Spanish speaking, LGBTQI, African American, Transgender, homeless, drug user and other. With a long experience as an HIV testing and prevention counselor, clinical health educator, entertainer and activist in the community, Ramón has been able to experience firsthand the disparities these communities experience from both sides of the spectrum. Ramón works for a large medical provider company as a Clinical Health Educator helping patients by providing education on safer sex, PrEP, weight management, diabetes diagnosis and healthy habits among other topics. Ramón wants to bring to the table experience living as a gay Mexican American and active community member.
Javier Ríos, MA

Javier Ríos, MA

Pronouns: he, him, his
Javier Ríos was born and raised in Santa Fe, New Mexico and is a New Mexican of diverse Irish, Mexican, and LGBTQ background. Javier joined UNM Truman Health Services in the Manzano School Based Health Center as the Health Educator in October 2016, bringing 11 years of non-profit and government experience focused in health equity, HIV/AIDS prevention, harm reduction, immigrant health, and cultural humility. In 2017 and 2013 Javier participated in the U.S.-Mexico Border Health Commission program Líderes a través de las Fronteras/Leaders across Borders addressing binational and border health. Since 2005 Javier has worked in HIV/AIDS prevention with LGBTQ+ communities of color focusing in community organizing, outreach, and education. His community recognitions include the 2013 Pride and Equality Vincent R. Johnson Models of Hope Award, the 2012 NMCPAG Kahlo Benavidez Leadership Award, and service as a 2012 HIV/AIDS Embajador/Ambassador for the National Latino AIDS Action Network at the XIX International AIDS Conference in Washington D.C. Currently Javier is the Communications Chair of the National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities Region VI Southwest RHEC, as well as the co-chair for the Immigrant Committee of the City of Santa Fe. Javier earned his M.A. in Spanish: Southwest Studies from the University of New Mexico in 2005 where he taught Spanish as a Heritage Language. Javier received his B.A. from Creighton University in 2001. Javier is excited to be a part of The PRIDE Study team that cultivates health awareness of our diverse LGBTQ+ communities.
Karalin Sprague, MSW

Karalin Sprague, MSW

Pronouns: she, her, hers

Kara Sprague (she/her) is the Director of Strategy & Impact at SAGE, the nation’s oldest and largest organization dedicated to improving the lives of LGBT+ older adults, where she has worked since 2014. In this role, Kara is responsible for implementation and measurement of SAGE’s Strategic Plan, providing consultation on program evaluation and impact assessment across the organization, and promotion of a data-informed culture. Prior to SAGE, Kara worked in a variety of program evaluation and implementation roles across HIV services and international development. Kara has a B.A. in Sociology from American University and an M.S.W. from Fordham University.

PRIDEnet Ambassadors

Ash Doss-Hunter

Ash Doss-Hunter

Pronouns: they/them

Ash Doss- Hunter is an Arkansas native from the small farm town of Holly Grove. Ash is a 2018 graduate of UA Little Rock with a Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies. As a student, they were involved in the on campus LGBTQ group, The Alliance, first as a member and later becoming President.

Ash currently works as a Crisis Hotline advocate, assisting women and children escaping domestic violence, to safe, stable housing.

They are a former Secretary of the board of the Arkansas Transgender Equity Collaborative.  

Ash has been a long time grass roots activist in Central Arkansas. Representing a part of the community often overlooked and erased, as a non-binary black queer person. Ash has never hesitated to step up to make their voice known, through staging die-ins, collaborating with other local organizations to make a vocal stand against rampant racism within the LGBTQ community, pairing up with other southern queer organizers to innovate, create and hold spaces for the most vulnerable in the community, raising funds to sustain equity, lobby, leading protests taking them from the state capitol to the gates of the governor to lift up the voices of their people. 

Daryl Mangosing, MPH

DRPH STUDENT

University of California Berkeley (UCB), School of Public Health (SPH)

Daryl Mangosing, MPH

DrPH Student University of California Berkeley (UCB), School of Public Health (SPH)
Pronouns: all pronouns or he/they/she
Daryl Mangosing, MPH is currently a graduate student in the Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) program at the University of California Berkeley (UCB), School of Public Health (SPH). Within the SPH Community, they serve as a Graduate Recruitment and Diversity Service (GRADS) Ambassador for the DREAM (Diversity Respect Equity Action Multiculturalism) Office and remain active with Queering Public Health, a space dedicated to fostering community for those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, questioning, intersex, and allies in SPH. 

They are also a member of the UCB Pilipinx American Graduate Student Association or PAGaSA. Prior, they have worked for over three and a half years at the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies and Prevention Research Center in the Division of Prevention Science at the University of California San Francisco, where they drove communication efforts and disseminated HIV prevention and public health research. 

As a queer Filipino-American born and raised on the island of Guam, they pursued an independent major in health sciences at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky with a full-tuition scholarship in 2013. Afterwards, they attended Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts and graduated in 2015 with an MPH, concentrating in health communication. Daryl’s research interests lie within the intersection of LGBTQ health disparities, identity and intersectionality, community engagement, and public health discourse. For their doctoral studies, Daryl is interested in critically studying “party and play” or chemsex behaviors as subculture (i.e., illicit drug use to facilitate and enhance sexual activity) among gay and bisexual men and their health outcomes in the context of biomedical HIV prevention and online sexual networking applications.
Raisa S. Negrón

Raisa S. Negrón

Pronouns: she, her, hers
Raisa S. Negrón earned a BA in Psychology from Eastern Connecticut State University. She has spent the majority of her career as a sexuality educator teaching and improving the sexual health needs of many individuals working with non-profits, private sector and as a consultant. With 20 years of experience, Raisa shares that body image, sexual expression, including our overall health are inter- connected and an integral part of who we are. Acknowledging our individual culture plays a role, too. When these are in alignment, and we have un-learned negative behaviors, we begin to feel more satisfaction with our bodies and ourselves. Raisa currently works in HIV prevention, specifically adolescent health, LGBTQ* youth, along with persons struggling with tobacco, alcohol, other substance misuse to improve their health outcomes. Raisa speaks Spanish, is a qualified medical interpreter and trainer in the healthcare industry.
Hanh Nguyen

Hanh Nguyen

Pronouns: she, her, hers

Hanh Nguyen was born and raised in San Jose, California. As the daughter of refugee parents, she experienced disparities in health and privilege which motivate her to pursue a career at the intersection of medicine, public health, and social justice. She attended the University of California Davis where she graduated with a BS in Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior. She returned to San Jose to work in education, health engagement, and outreach among the community she grew up in. She is now gaining clinical experience while working as a scribe at a hospital and health center. In her free time, she practices yoga, reads, eats, and helps facilitate a community for queer Christians.

Rosaia Shepard

Rosaia Shepard

Pronouns: she, her, hers

Rosaia Shepard grew up in Seattle’s Colored District, where, as a student activist in the 1960s, she fought racism, sexism, sexual abuse, as well as sexual orientation discrimination. Over the decades, ableism and ageism were added to the list. Rosaia has held many management, advising, and consulting positions for various enterprises including the Internal Revenue Service, the University of Washington, and Deloitte. Recently retired in Metro Atlanta, she writes nonfiction and volunteers her time supporting Georgia political candidates who advance LGBTQIAP rights. Rosaia holds a B.A. in African American Studies and Literature from the University of Washington and an MBA from the University of Arizona.

Paul Vila

Paul Vila

Pronouns: he, him, his, él

Paul Vila is a freelance web developer and writer. He attended New College of Florida, where he graduated with a BA in Political Science and Environmental Studies. His academic work has focused on marrying scientific literacy and in-depth understandings of sociopolitical structures with the goal of disassembling systemic injustices. With that in mind, much of his current activist work centers on outreach for LGBTQ+ health issues, with an emphasis on Latinx communities. 

SaVanna Wanzer

SaVanna Wanzer

Pronouns: she, her, hers
SaVanna Wanzer has been a DC Trans advocate, HIV educator, and community volunteer for more than 25 years.  As the founder of Capital Trans Pride in 2007, she later started May Is?  All About Trans in 2018, a series of events celebrating, featuring, and loving transgender people. Designed to educate and build bridges across all communities, SaVanna has grown her vision to include organizations and individuals from across the country. During her many years of service, SaVanna was the first transgender woman to serve on the boards of Whitman-Walker Health and the Capital Pride Alliance. She has also served on the DC Mayor’s LGBTQ Advisory Committee, and started and maintained multiple peer mentoring programs. An active CAP member for NMAC & DCCFAR.  Among her many awards, 2019 she was one of Leon Harris’ NBC 4 Heroes and TAGG Magazine, she was recognized with DC’s Black Pride Unsung Hero Award in 2017, Whitman-Walker Legal’s Robert Fenner Urquhart Memorial Award in 2015, and Capital Pride’s Hero Award in 2008.  Retired from the federal government, SaVanna remains very active in her community and at Westminster Presbyterian Church in DC.  Her future goal to take May Is? “All About Trans” National level.
Lou Weaver

LGBTQ COMMITTEE CO-LEAD

Doctors for Change

Lou Weaver

LGBTQ Committee Co-lead Doctors for Change
Pronouns: he, him, his
Lou Weaver is a queer transgender man and a leader in Houston’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community. Lou is a sought-after speaker on transgender topics across Texas. With trans healthcare as a key component of his advocacy portfolio, he has helped educate healthcare providers and medical student groups on culturally competent care for the LGBTQ communities. Lou is an engaging and thoughtful facilitator of tough, personal conversations on sexual and gender minorities.

Research Methods and Content Advisors

Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD, MAS

Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD, MAS

Pronouns: she, her, hers
Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, PhD, MD, MAS is the Lee Goldman, MD Endowed Chair in Medicine and Professor of Medicine and of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. She is the Director of the UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital, a Board Member of UCSF’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), Director of the CTSI Clinical and Translational Science Training (CTST) Program and a faculty member for its K Scholar Program. She is the PI of two collaborative center grants from the NIH/NIMHD - the Center for Health And Risk in Minority youth and adults (CHARM) addressing disparities in chronic disease in youth and young adults, and BUILD an infrastructure and training grant with San Francisco State University. She is also the joint PI of Bring It Down - an NIH/NINDS U54 research center addressing stroke prevention and stroke disparities in collaboration with Kaiser Permanente Northern California. A general internist at San Francisco General Hospital and faculty member in the Division of General Internal Medicine, Dr. Bibbins-Domingo has expertise in cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes risk in young adults. Her work focuses on racial, ethnic and income differences in manifestations of chronic disease; the intersection of biological, behavioral, and environmental factors that influence risk; and effective clinical, public health, and policy interventions aimed at prevention. Dr. Bibbins-Domingo has interest in local, national, and global prevention efforts and has collaborated with investigators in Mexico, Argentina, Chile, and China. She has been a member of the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) since 2010 and is currently the Chairperson of the USPSTF. She is an inducted member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation.
Matthew Capriotti, PhD

MENTAL HEALTH CONTENT EXPERT

The PRIDE Study

Matthew Capriotti, PhD

Mental Health Content Expert The PRIDE Study
Pronouns: he, him, his
Matthew (Matt) Capriotti, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Psychology Department at San Jose State University and a Research Associate in the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Matt earned his doctoral degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and he completed pre-doctoral and postdoctoral fellowships at UCSF. Matt studies factors that promote resilience and wellbeing among sexual and gender minority people, with an emphasis on youth and young adults. He has a particular research interest in engaging young adults in evidence-based approaches to HIV prevention and treatment, including pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Matt also maintains an active line of research on the development, testing, and implementation of evidence-based behavioral interventions for young people with tic disorders (e.g., Tourette syndrome), other obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Matt is thrilled to be a part of The PRIDE Study's efforts to identify and end health disparities faced by sexual and gender minority communities.
David Glidden, PhD

David Glidden, PhD

Pronouns: he, him, his
Dave Glidden, PhD is a Professor of Biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco with over 20 years of collaborations with investigators in HIV Treatment, HIV Prevention, Pediatrics and Neurology.
Mark Pletcher, MD, MPH

Mark Pletcher, MD, MPH

Pronouns: he, him, his
Mark Pletcher, MD, MPH is a Professor of Epidemiology & Biostatistics and of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). As an epidemiologist and a general internal medicine physician, his research is designed to inform clinical decision-making and policy. This work focuses on prevention of cardiovascular disease with particular interests in early life causes of atherosclerosis, primordial and primary coronary heart disease and stroke prevention, clinical decision-making regarding use of preventive medications (statins and anti-hypertensives), and screening for subclinical cardiovascular disease. He serves as a principal investigator for the Health eHeart Study, an online technology-enabled cardiovascular cohort study. Dr. Pletcher has specific expertise in study design, decision and cost-effectiveness analysis, risk prediction, and evaluating the clinical utility of biomarkers. He utilizes this expertise in his leading role with UCSF’s nationally recognized clinical research training programs by teaching clinical research methods as well mentoring students, fellows, and junior faculty members.
Jae Sevelius, PhD

Jae Sevelius, PhD

Pronouns: she, her, hers
Jae Sevelius, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and Associate Professor with the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS) in the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Sevelius leads several research projects at the Center of Excellence for Transgender Health to promote increased access to culturally competent health care for transgender people. With funding from the National Institutes of Health and the California HIV/AIDS Research Program, Dr. Sevelius’ research is focused on leveraging data to develop culturally relevant, transgender–specific programs and interventions to promote holistic health and wellness among transgender people, with an emphasis on serving transgender women of color and those affected by HIV. Dr. Sevelius is currently conducting a randomized controlled trial of ’Healthy Divas’, a peer-delivered intervention to increase engagement in care and medication adherence among transgender women living with HIV (R01MH106373) with funding from NIMH. Their team is also developing an intervention for transgender women incarcerated in the San Francisco County Jail (R34DA038541) with funding from NIDA to increase engagement in health care upon reentry into the community. Dr. Sevelius recently completed a pilot randomized controlled trial of ’Sheroes’, a sexual risk reduction and empowerment intervention developed in collaboration with and for transgender women of color (R34MH102109), and recently launched the TRIUMPH project as part of the first trans-specific PrEP demonstration initiative in California (CHRP, PR-15-SF007). Additionally, Dr. Sevelius is Co-Investigator on several transgender-focused projects, including a national 9 site demonstration project testing interventions to engage and retain HIV+ transgender women of color in care (PI: G. Rebchook), and formative research with transgender women in Brazil (PI: S. Lippman).

Affiliated Research Team

Branden Barger, MAS

RESEARCH ASSISTANT

The PRIDE Study

Branden Barger, MAS

Research Assistant The PRIDE Study
Pronouns: he, him, his

Branden Barger, MAS is the program coordinator for the UCSF Office of Diversity & Outreach LGBT and Multicultural Resource Centers where he provides program, curriculum, and graphic design assistance in the centers’ efforts to increase visibility and inclusion of marginalized and underrepresented students, staff, and faculty throughout the UCSF health system and its various health professions training programs. Branden holds a Master of Advanced Studies in Clinical Research from the UCSF School of Medicine Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics and is a graduate of University of California, Berkeley with a degree in Public Health. Branden partnered with The PRIDE Study as part of his graduate program to examine substance use health disparities and resiliencies among sexual and gender minorities and he continues to support these efforts as a volunteer research assistant with the Sexual and Gender Minority Health Equity Lab in the UCSF School of Nursing Department of Community Health Systems.

Daniel Beltre

MEDICAL STUDENT

SUNY Downstate College of Medicine

Daniel Beltre

Medical Student SUNY Downstate College of Medicine
Pronouns: he, him, his
Daniel Beltre is a medical student at SUNY Downstate College of Medicine in Brooklyn, New York. Daniel has a vibrant set of interests that involve the intersection of identity and healthcare. In medical school Daniel is committed to remodeling the curriculum to better represent sexual and gender minorities and is currently involved with the Brooklyn Free Health Clinic’s RISE program to provide psychosocially competent HIV and HCV counseling. Prior to medical school Daniel was involved with the MSF HIV and TB Policy Access Campaign. Daniel is very excited to be a part of The PRIDE Study and work towards broadening the clinical and cultural understanding of our LGBTQ+ community.
Hannah Bosley, M.A.

PHD CANDIDATE IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

UC Berkeley

Hannah Bosley, M.A.

PhD candidate in Clinical Psychology UC Berkeley
Pronouns: she/her/hers
Hannah Bosley, MA is a PhD candidate in Clinical Psychology at UC Berkeley. Hannah’s doctoral research aims to identify how an individual’s unique emotional patterns may relate to their experience of mental health or behavioral problems, by building person-specific statistical models to answer questions like: what emotions does an individual most need to regulate? How do we know when a particular emotion state will occur? What leads to change in these emotion states over time? Person-specific modeling can be particularly helpful in understanding the unique needs of minority communities that tend to be underrepresented in large population-based averages. Hannah is particularly passionate about applying these methods to better understand and serve the mental health needs of sexual and gender minority (SGM) individuals. Hannah also works as a clinical interventionist with Dr. Annesa Flentje’s research team at UCSF, delivering a psychotherapeutic intervention designed to reduce minority stress and improve mental health in SGM individuals.
Janessa Broussard, MSN, RN, AGNP-C

DOCTORAL STUDENT IN NURSING

University of California San Francisco School of Nursing

Janessa Broussard, MSN, RN, AGNP-C

Doctoral Student in Nursing University of California San Francisco School of Nursing
Pronouns: she, her, hers
Janessa Broussard, MSN, RN, AGNP-C is a Doctoral Student in the Community Health Systems Department of the UCSF School of Nursing. Currently she practices in a clinic specializing in sexual health and HIV care. She works primarily with members of the LGBTQ+, homeless, and persons who inject drugs (PWID) communities. Her primary interest is creating and promoting inclusive, low-barrier access models of care.  Lack of research to guide care of sexual and gender minority (SGM) communities motivated her to pursue a PhD. Her goal is to contribute to research focused on developing evidence based guidelines for SGM individuals. Additionally, she plans to develop curriculum focused on inclusive, affirming care and to continue to educate other medical professionals in this area.
Alexis Ceja

POST-BACCALAUREATE TRAINEE

University of California, San Francisco

Alexis Ceja

Post-baccalaureate Trainee
University of California, San Francisco
Pronouns: she/her/hers, they/them/theirs

Alexis Ceja is currently a trainee in the post-baccalaureate program (PROPEL) at the University of California, San Francisco. In the Sexual and Gender Minority Health Equity lab, Alexis works with Dr. Annesa Flentje on several projects investigating the effects of intersectionality on sexual and gender minority (SGM) health disparities. Alexis’s goal is be admitted into a Clinical Psychology program and continue investigating substance use disparities and ways to reduce these disparities within SGM communities. Outside of her research, Alexis serves on the leadership team of the LGBTQ Health Journal Club and volunteers in Científico Latino, a program aimed at increasing the diversity of graduate school applicants and STEM professionals. Alexis is very excited to join The PRIDE Study and work towards reducing health disparities among our diverse SGM communities.

Ethan Cicero, PhD, RN

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

Emory University

NELL HODGSON WOODRUFF SCHOOL OF NURSING

Ethan Cicero, PhD, RN

Assistant Professor Emory University
Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
Pronouns: he, him, his, they, them, their

Ethan Cicero, PhD, RN is an Assistant Professor in the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future of Nursing Scholar. Prior to joining Emory in August 2020, Dr. Cicero completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in the Biobehavioral Research Training in Symptom Science Program at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing. He earned a PhD from the Duke University School of Nursing in 2018 and a BS in Nursing with Highest Honors from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2014. Their program of research is focused on evaluating the interrelationship between social inequities and the effects of adverse and affirming social conditions on the health and well-being of transgender populations, with a particular interest in methods used for transgender health research.

Kristen Clark

PHD CANDIDATE

University of California San Francisco School of Nursing

Kristen Clark

PhD Candidate University of California San Francisco School of Nursing
Pronouns: she, her, hers
Kristen Drew Clark is a PhD Candidate in Nursing at the University of California, San Francisco. Her doctoral research is centered on the structural barriers to health care access, health care experiences, and symptom experiences of transgender and gender expansive people in the United States. Her doctoral work is funded through a National Institute for Nursing Research pre-doctoral fellowship (F31).  
Prior to pursuing her PhD, Kristen worked clinically as a nurse in inpatient mental health, specializing in crisis stabilization care. In this capacity she worked to advocate for more inclusive and knowledgeable mental health care for transgender people through improved hospital policies and increasing education in Florida nursing schools.
O. Winslow Edwards

MPH CANDIDATE

Simon Fraser University

O. Winslow Edwards

MPH Candidate Simon Fraser University
Pronouns: they, them, their
O. Winslow Edwards is a Master’s of Public Health student at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, BC in the Social Inequities and Health concentration. Their research is focused on using strengths-based methodologies to explore community resilience for sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations, with particular attention to amplifying voices within the community that have been historically marginalized. Prior to starting their MPH, Winslow worked as a clinical research coordinator on HPV studies with people living with HIV in Louisiana. They were also involved in grassroots level organizing surrounding systemic racial inequities and SGM rights. In their free time, Winslow volunteers with SGM community organizations that are engaged in decreasing stigma towards HIV and Hepatitis C, as well as using harm-reduction approaches to sexual health and drug use.
Shane Lamba

RESEARCH ASSISTANT

Shane Lamba

Research Assistant
Pronouns: he/him/his

Shane Lamba is a Health Science Specialist in the Spinal Cord Injuries and Disorders (SCI/D) Center at the VA Palo Alto Healthcare System. He works on a multidisciplinary team, where he serves as one of the exoskeleton trainers collecting data on how its usage with Veterans can help improve quality of life for those living with a SCI. Additionally, he has brought to his team at the SCI center, a rejuvenated need for LGBT centered health research, he is diligently working alongside collaborators in applying for funding to initiate qualitative research on topics related to health equity and disability.

He also serves as a member on the Cultural Competency committee for the VA SCI/D Center, working alongside clinicians to bring diversity and inclusion trainings regarding LGBT Veterans. Shane will be enrolled in the Fall as a Master's of Public Health graduate student at the University of New England, where he intends to focus on community health promotion and education. He is a Bay Area native, and enjoys being active outdoors and relaxing at the beach. Shane is super excited to be a part of The PRIDE Study, as he believes it will help broaden his skill sets working with community engaged research methodology and health equity.

Pip G. Lipkin, B.A.

MEDICAL STUDENT

The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Pip G. Lipkin, B.A.

Medical Student The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
Pronouns: they, them, theirs / he, him, his 

Pip G. Lipkin, BA is a medical student at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University applying into OB/GYN. They came to medicine by way of studying English and Art History as an undergraduate and working in hospice, where they witnessed the power of care, attention, art and humanism in the practice of healing. In medical school they have focused efforts on making healthcare approachable and accessible through health education courses for incarcerated youth and folks experiencing chronic homelessness. Pip has also been dedicated to the advocacy and support of trans* and gender diverse (T/GD) medical students by founding a T/GD support group as well as creating a T/GD training for medical clerkship directors and coordinators to ensure T/GD medical students are supported in the clinical space. Their current research is at the intersection of family building, fertility preservation and the reproductive health needs of T/GD individuals. 

Sean Luong, BA, RN

MASTER’S STUDENT IN NURSING

University of California San Francisco School of Nursing

Sean Luong, BA, RN

Master’s Student in Nursing University of California San Francisco School of Nursing
Pronouns: He, they
Sean Luong, BA, RN is a Master’s Student in the School of Nursing at UCSF, working on their training as an Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist. In a past life, Sean graduated from UC Berkeley with a Bachelor’s in Sociology, focused primarily on areas of gender, sexuality, and race. Coming into the world of nursing, Sean strives to apply a critical lens to the obstacles within systems and institutions that LGBT patients have to navigate in order to meet their health needs, especially trans folk and folks of color.
 
Motivated in shifting the focus of healthcare towards patients from marginalized groups, Sean hopes to re-envision the way care is accessed and provided to those who need it the most, and yet do not receive necessary care. Sean is happy to have the opportunity to be working with The PRIDE Study in highlighting issues that LGBT queer people face when trying to receive the health care they deserve. Sean is grateful for the work already done and that which continues to be done by those beside them.
Daryl Mangosing, MPH

DRPH STUDENT

University of California Berkeley (UCB), School of Public Health (SPH)

Daryl Mangosing, MPH

DrPH Student University of California Berkeley (UCB), School of Public Health (SPH)
Pronouns: all pronouns or he/they/she

Daryl Mangosing, MPH is currently a graduate student in the Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) program at the University of California Berkeley (UCB), School of Public Health (SPH). Within the SPH Community, they serve as a Graduate Recruitment and Diversity Service (GRADS) Ambassador for the DREAM (Diversity Respect Equity Action Multiculturalism) Office and remain active with Queering Public Health, a space dedicated to fostering community for those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, questioning, intersex, and allies in SPH.

They are also a member of the UCB Pilipinx American Graduate Student Association or PAGaSA. Prior, they have worked for over three and a half years at the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies and Prevention Research Center in the Division of Prevention Science at the University of California San Francisco, where they drove communication efforts and disseminated HIV prevention and public health research.

As a queer Filipino-American born and raised on the island of Guam, they pursued an independent major in health sciences at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky with a full-tuition scholarship in 2013. Afterwards, they attended Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts and graduated in 2015 with an MPH, concentrating in health communication. Daryl’s research interests lie within the intersection of LGBTQ health disparities, identity and intersectionality, community engagement, and public health discourse. For their doctoral studies, Daryl is interested in critically studying “party and play” or chemsex behaviors as subculture (i.e., illicit drug use to facilitate and enhance sexual activity) among gay and bisexual men and their health outcomes in the context of biomedical HIV prevention and online sexual networking applications.

Sawye Raygani

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT

Stanford University

Sawye Raygani

Undergraduate Student Stanford University
Pronouns: she/her/hers
Sawye Raygani is an undergraduate student at Stanford University majoring in Human Biology and minoring in Psychology. She joined The PRIDE Study to better understand how social and cultural determinants of health impact mental health in sexual and gender minority populations and how to promote inclusivity in healthcare practices. On campus, she's involved in infectious disease and microbiome research and volunteers at Arbor Free Clinic as a Bridge to Care Counselor. In the future, she hopes to work at the intersection of public health and clinical medicine and contribute to meaningful research regarding marginalized communities in the healthcare system.
Ben Liad Schwartz

MEDICAL STUDENT

Stanford University School of Medicine

Ben Liad Schwartz

Medical Student Stanford University School of Medicine
Pronouns: He/Him/His

Ben Schwartz is a medical student at Stanford Medicine who is passionate about using research to support tangible, impactful reform for LGBTQ+ communities. As an undergraduate, he attended Stanford University, where he earned a BS in Biology and a BA in Religious Studies, graduated with honors, and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. His previous research focused on using advances in health sciences to eradicate LGBTQ+ discrimination in religious communities. Mental health and its requisite destigmatization played pivotal roles in his work. Ben also served as the president of Jewish Queers, a Stanford student organization focused on creating space for those identifying as Jewish and queer. As a medical student, he was elected by his class to serve as one of two Recruitment Chairs, a position designed to facilitate student involvement in the admissions process, welcome prospective students to Stanford for their interviews, and recruit a diverse group of students to comprise the incoming class. Moreover, Ben currently serves as co-chair of LGBTQ+ Meds, the primary LGBTQ+ medical student organization at Stanford. He hopes to work closely with faculty to more explicitly integrate the care of LGBTQ+ patients into clinical training.

Ben is eager to bring his personal experiences and academic/professional interests to the PRIDE Study team. He hopes to explore the healthcare dynamics of queer identity, the medical implications of sociocultural repression, and the dermatological care of LGBTQ+ patients.

Ava Snow

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT

Stanford University

Ava Snow

Undergraduate Student Stanford University
Pronouns: she/her/hers
Ava Snow is an undergraduate student at Stanford studying Human Biology. She is from Bozeman, Montana, and began exploring her interest in LGBTQ+ health as a peer educator for a local sexual and reproductive healthcare clinic when she was in high school. On campus, she volunteers as a counselor at the Sexual Health Peer Resource Center, and as a Patient Health Navigator at Pacific Free Clinic. She is so excited to work with and learn from all of the incredible people who are involved with the Pride Study!
Brett Aaron Stark, MD, MPH

OBGYN RESIDENT

University of California, San Francisco

Brett Aaron Stark, MD, MPH

OBGYN Resident University of California, San Francisco
Pronouns: he/him/his
Brett Stark, is a resident physician in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of California, San Francisco. His prior research has explored family building desire for LGBTQ+ youth, mostly working at the intersection of family building and fertility preservation for transgender and non-binary adolescents.  Currently, Brett is working with The PRIDE Study to develop clinical tools to better describe the sexual health and well-being of LGBTQ+ populations.
Leslie Suen, MD

CLINICAL RESEARCH FELLOW

University of California San Francisco

Leslie Suen, MD

Clinical Research Fellow University of California San Francisco
Pronouns: she, her, hers
Leslie Suen, MD, is a primary care internist and Veterans Affairs Clinical Research Fellow in the National Clinician Scholars Program at UCSF. She completed her internal medicine training in the UC Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency program at UCSF, where she also completed medical school. Prior to medical school, she worked for the San Francisco Department of Public Health and Tom Waddell Urban Health Clinic focusing on quality improvement work in safety-net settings. Her research focuses on using implementation science and community engagement to eliminate health disparities for underserved populations, including sexual and gender minority communities and individuals living with substance use disorders. Leslie is thrilled to be a part of The PRIDE Study to shine a light on the diverse needs of sexual and gender minority communities and improve the design of sexual orientation and gender identity questions.
Michael Trujillo, PhD

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH FELLOW

University of California San Francisco Department of Psychiatry

Michael Trujillo, PhD

Postdoctoral Research Fellow University of California San Francisco Department of Psychiatry
Pronouns: Any
Michael Trujillo, PhD is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the UCSF Department of Psychiatry. Michael completed their PhD in Health Psychology at Virginia Commonwealth University and is currently completing a T32 postdoctoral fellowship in Psychology and Medicine investigating the physiological underpinnings of sexual prejudice and its impact on health. Their research is driven by models that view stigma as a fundamental cause of health disparities and examines the social-cognitive, affective, biological, and behavioral factors that underlie the association between stigma and health. As a Graduate Research Fellow of the National Science Foundation, they examined how anti-gay harassment impacted risk-taking and the role of internalized stigma. Michael is also interested in identifying collective and personal strengths that promote resilience that allow individuals to thrive in the face of stigma. They are thrilled to be a part of The PRIDE Study as a means to end health disparities faced by sexual and gender minorities.
Ellora Vilkin, B.A.

PHD STUDENT IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Stony Brook University

Ellora Vilkin, B.A.

PhD Student in Clinical Psychology Stony Brook University
Pronouns: she/her/hers
Ellora Vilkin is a PhD student in Clinical Psychology at Stony Brook University. Her doctoral research focuses on understanding how close relationships impact health among people with diverse relationship structures and dynamics (e.g. consensual non-monogamy, kink/BDSM) and understudied sexual identities (e.g. bisexual, pansexual, and queer folks). Ellora is also involved in developing and testing evidence-based psychosocial interventions to improve relationship and mental health outcomes among sexual and gender minority people. 

Ellora received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English with Honors in Nonfiction Writing from Brown University in 2014. Prior to graduate school, she became interested in social determinants of health while working at the San Francisco LGBT Center and Trans Employment Program, where she provided direct services to LGBTQ+ adults. Ellora has been involved with The PRIDE Study since 2017 and is honored to support its mission of engaging sexual and gender minority people in research to advance the health of our communities.
Adary Zhang

MEDICAL STUDENT

Stanford Medical School

Adary Zhang

Medical Student Stanford Medical School
Pronouns: They/them/she/hers
Ada is a medical student, writer, and community organizer who is interested in how community-based work incorporating the thoughtful and compassionate practice of medicine has the potential to address the systemic and structural inequities that affect communities decentered by white supremacy and cisheteropatriarchy in the US and abroad. In the past, they have worked extensively to elevate the voices of queer and trans A/API communities, decrease health inequities in the US and in Hong Kong, and research the role of implicit bias in racism. In the coming years, they hope to delve more deeply into research, policy, and organizing work focused on amplifying the experiences of queer and trans people of color around the world.
Matthew (Matta) Zheng

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT

Stanford University

Matthew (Matta) Zheng

Undergraduate Student Stanford University
Pronouns: he, him, his, they, them, their
Matthew (Matta) Zheng is an undergraduate student at Stanford University, double majoring in Anthropology and Political Science with a minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Prior to Stanford, he attended the United World College of the Atlantic in Wales, where he led the campus LGBTQ+ activism group. Today, he is the founding coordinator of a queer interfaith spirituality group at Stanford's Queer Student Resources (QSR) and Office of Religious Life (ORL) while counseling patients and developing a comprehensive LGBTQ+ healthcare system at Pacific Free Clinic. Academically, Matthew's research has focused on the political economy of neoliberalism at Stanford's Center for the Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences with Professor Margaret Levi. His interests lie in community health, intertwining social justice and medicine, and in uplifting his queer communities in any way possible. Outside of work, he loves being a drag artist, cooking, and playing the steelpan. In the future, Matthew aspires to complete an MD/MPP with particular emphasis on health policymaking. He joins PRIDELab research after serving a year as the Undergraduate Assistant at The PRIDE Study, and is so excited to work closely in SGM/LGBTQ+ health research. 

The PRIDE Study thanks its former team members for their contributions:

A Message from the Directors

My interest in LGBTQ+ health began in medical school when I became frustrated about how little we knew about the healthcare inequities LGBTQ+ people face. As an out gay man, I feel connected to LGBTQ+ populations with a sense of responsibility to improve the quality of the data available with the overarching goal to improve health. Our research showed that medical students are taught little about LGBTQ+-related health, but a new question arose: what are the LGBTQ+-related health topics that must be taught to the physician workforce? That question requires notable evidence about the disparities, and these data are unavailable.

In 2011, the Institute of Medicine composed a report on LGBT health, which stated: “The relative lack of population-based data presents the greatest challenge to describing the health status and health-related needs of LGBT people.” That quote is particularly powerful to me and serves as a call to action! Unfortunately, sexual and gender minorities remain largely excluded from national demographic assessments, health studies, and clinical trials. Without long-term longitudinal studies, detailing the factors that influence health and disease in the LGBTQ+ populations will be challenging. But I believe that current scientific and sociopolitical environments are ripe for change!

The time is now for all LGBTQ+ people to come out for PRIDE! By doing so, we can get the data we need to improve health for everyone!

Stanford Medicine Profile

- Mitchell R. Lunn

I never intended to focus my time on LGBTQ+ health. But as an out lesbian, I knew that, regardless of what I did professionally, I needed to know how to take care of my friends and the members of my communities that I care so much about. I had lesbian friends who developed cervical cancer even though they “weren’t supposed to.” I had trans friends who were having kids even though medical science said they “couldn’t,” and I had gay friends who were more worried about their risk of heart disease than HIV but couldn’t get the information they needed. So, when the topic of LGBTQ+ health issues never came up in my medical training, I got fired up to start researching and advocating for LGBTQ+ health beyond my circle of friends.

But the more I looked, the more I found a lot of dangerous misinformation and unanswered questions. I found that LGBTQ+ people were categorized and stigmatized, but our experiences were never understood. Medical science seemed blind to the uniquely beautiful and challenging ways that LGBTQ+ people have navigated and created their lives.

It is time for us to be counted. It is time for medical science to understand our health so we get the care and services we need.

This is what The PRIDE Study is all about, a chance to put LGBTQ+ lives front and center so we can ask and answer the questions that matter to us.

Stanford Medicine Lab Page

- Juno Obedin-Maliver

What mark will you leave?

Stay in Touch with PRIDE